qubazoba

A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step.
Myvatn Nature Baths, Iceland
The Lake Mývatn region is one of Iceland’s most geologically active. The area is dotted with volcanic craters and bubbling mud pits and is one of the most-visited areas outside of Reykjavik. One of the most-popular attractions in the region is the Mývatn Nature Baths, one of Iceland’s newest geothermal spas.
Opened in 2004, the Mývatn Nature Baths, are similar to the more famous Blue Lagoon of Reykjavik. Created from the run-off of a geothermal power-plant, the baths contain bright blue steaming water that comes from deep under the earth and contains a high level of silica.
In addition to the main lagoon, the baths offer hot pots (hot tubs), natural steam baths, relaxation areas, and a cafe and small shop. In summer, the baths are open from 9am to midnight; in winter hours are noon to 10pm. Entrance is prohibited 30 minutes from closing.
Adult admission is 2000 ISK with an additional 400 each for bathing suite or towel rental and 700 kronur for a robe rental.

Myvatn Nature Baths, Iceland

The Lake Mývatn region is one of Iceland’s most geologically active. The area is dotted with volcanic craters and bubbling mud pits and is one of the most-visited areas outside of Reykjavik. One of the most-popular attractions in the region is the Mývatn Nature Baths, one of Iceland’s newest geothermal spas.

Opened in 2004, the Mývatn Nature Baths, are similar to the more famous Blue Lagoon of Reykjavik. Created from the run-off of a geothermal power-plant, the baths contain bright blue steaming water that comes from deep under the earth and contains a high level of silica.

In addition to the main lagoon, the baths offer hot pots (hot tubs), natural steam baths, relaxation areas, and a cafe and small shop. In summer, the baths are open from 9am to midnight; in winter hours are noon to 10pm. Entrance is prohibited 30 minutes from closing.

Adult admission is 2000 ISK with an additional 400 each for bathing suite or towel rental and 700 kronur for a robe rental.

(via condenasttraveler)

On 10 June 1963, Vietnamese monk Thích Quảng Đức burned himself to death at a busy intersection in Saigon. He emerged from a car, seated himself in the lotus position and meditated while his colleagues poured gasoline over him. Đức then struck a match and dropped it on himself. As flames consumed his robes and flesh, “he never moved a muscle, never uttered a sound, his outward composure in sharp contrast to the wailing people around him.” The self-immolation was done in response to the persecution of Buddhists by South Vietnam’s Ngo Dinh Diem administration. This picture, first published in black and white, was taken by Associated Press photographer Malcolm Browne.

On 10 June 1963, Vietnamese monk Thích Quảng Đức burned himself to death at a busy intersection in Saigon. He emerged from a car, seated himself in the lotus position and meditated while his colleagues poured gasoline over him. Đức then struck a match and dropped it on himself. As flames consumed his robes and flesh, “he never moved a muscle, never uttered a sound, his outward composure in sharp contrast to the wailing people around him.” The self-immolation was done in response to the persecution of Buddhists by South Vietnam’s Ngo Dinh Diem administration. This picture, first published in black and white, was taken by Associated Press photographer Malcolm Browne.


They say of Berlin that it is a city that is always becoming but never being. In many respects, this is also true of Singapore. The city is characterised by intensity - in working, walking, shopping, studying, eating, travelling. Most importantly, the city is intense about becoming. However, in all that becoming, there are pockets of time when one looks over his shoulders and realises that the city has been a long way. And that in trying to be, the city has become.

They say of Berlin that it is a city that is always becoming but never being. In many respects, this is also true of Singapore. The city is characterised by intensity - in working, walking, shopping, studying, eating, travelling. Most importantly, the city is intense about becoming. However, in all that becoming, there are pockets of time when one looks over his shoulders and realises that the city has been a long way. And that in trying to be, the city has become.

The Al Khazneh (“The Treasury”) is one of the most elaborate buildings in the ancient Jordanian city of Petra. Build between 100 BC and AD 200 and carved out of a sandstone rock face, its name was derived from a legend which had bandits storing their loot in an urn on the second floor. The AL Khazneh has appeared in Indiana Jones and the Lost Crusade. Petra has been named by BBC as one of “the 40 places you have to see before you die”. 

The Al Khazneh (“The Treasury”) is one of the most elaborate buildings in the ancient Jordanian city of Petra. Build between 100 BC and AD 200 and carved out of a sandstone rock face, its name was derived from a legend which had bandits storing their loot in an urn on the second floor. The AL Khazneh has appeared in Indiana Jones and the Lost Crusade. Petra has been named by BBC as one of “the 40 places you have to see before you die”. 

(Source: ninbra, via condenasttraveler)

Robert Doisneau’s “Le Baiser” 

Robert Doisneau’s “Le Baiser” 

Marina Bay Sands Singapore. Feeling the blues. 

Marina Bay Sands Singapore. Feeling the blues. 

Famous photos

Famous photos